Racing is My Life and I Can’t Stop

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I took my three-year-old grandson to story hour at the local library. Afterward, he chose a DVD movie to take home; it’s about Blaze, a race car. Blaze goes to a city where cars race everywhere they go. The adventures are fun to watch and are interactive with the kids. My grandson learned the meaning of new words, how to count, and so forth. But for me, it made me think of the city where my wife and I recently moved after living in a small rural town.

We live a couple blocks from an interstate highway that gets us most places we go – shopping, grocery store, doctors, church, school events, and more. Whenever we go out, we race down the ramp to get on the interstate. Traffic is moving fast and once we get on cars push us to go faster. Seems like our life is in danger and we can’t slow down lest we cause an accident or make another driver angry.

The busy highway is like our busy and fast moving American culture. We have places to go, people to see, and activities to enjoy. It’s our way of life; it rarely stops.

The busy highway is like our busy and fast moving American culture. We have places to go, people to see, and activities to enjoy. It’s our way of life; it rarely stops. We may take a vacation, but when we get home, we feel like we still need a rest. However, we don’t rest; too much to do, we have to be successful at work, run kids around, and attend unending events. We can’t stop. We are bored if we do, and feel guilty for wasting time and not being productive. Oh yeah, we also hate silence, too many problems that are disturbing. Busyness and noise are good; blocks out what we don’t want to think about. Eventually, it all catches up to us. The activities, noise, and stress make us feel worn out. We start to experience increased problems and health issues. We tell ourselves we have to slow down, but we can’t stop, racing has become our way of life.

I liked a doctor who I wished to have as a friend, but, no time for us to meet, too busy. All his patients liked him because he took time with them, listened to them, and was very thorough in explaining their health problems in ways they could understand. However, he could not continue this way because the bosses he worked for said he spent too much time with patients. He needed to see more patients to keep the business financially stable. Like the interstate highway, he was pushed to go faster.

In the Bible, Luke 10:38-42, we read that Jesus stopped at Martha’s invitation to visit in their home. Martha was excited and was scurrying to put together a meal. Martha complained to Jesus about her sister not helping. Mary was sitting, doing nothing but taking in what Jesus had to say and having a meaningful conversation with him. Jesus responded to Martha, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and bothered about so many things; but one thing is necessary, for Mary has chosen the good part, which shall not be taken away from her.”

A picture of Jesus was sitting on a nearby table so I reached over and turned the picture in his direction. He looked at it and said, “Who, that guy?”

Each time I went into a certain store, I briefly carried on a friendly conversation with a man who worked there. One day he unexpectedly came to see me. He explained problems he was having in his marriage and wanted some advice on what to do. I said I would be glad to help, but there was someone who could help even more than I. A picture of Jesus was sitting on a nearby table so I reached over and turned the picture in his direction. He looked at it and said, “Who, that guy?” His tone of voice told me he did not think that guy had much to say to him about his marriage. I helped him with a few ideas, he seemed satisfied, and he was off again to the races.

I once read a short booklet called My Heart–Christ’s Home, by Robert Boyd Munger. It was about a man who welcomed Jesus to be part of his life. Jesus came to live with the man but they did not have a very deep and meaningful relationship. One day, the man was going past his living room on his way to some appointment when he noticed Jesus sitting in the room by himself. Jesus looked a bit lonely and sad, so he stopped and asked, “Have you been here long?” Jesus replied that he was here every day, waiting for him to stop and visit. This story made me think, is getting to know God something we have time to do?

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Jay Ashbaucher
Jay Ashbaucher is a native of Northwest Ohio and is currently a retired pastor and published author. He holds a Master of Divinity degree from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois, and has been a pastor and teacher in Montana for over 44 years. Jay taught grief classes in a hospital setting, and worked for twenty years as a fifth-step counselor and lecturer in an alcoholic-drug treatment center getting to know the hearts of people struggling to get well. While pastoring in Montana, he had enjoyed racquetball, hunting, fishing, and traveling the Big Sky State. Now living in Southeast Michigan, Jay enjoys his family, reading, hiking, golf, time with friends, and time with his fun-to-be-with wife. They have two happily married children and seven grandchildren.